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Fantasy Baseball Do’s and Dont’s for the Short Season

No need to fear, Alex is here! And he’s ready to help you get ready for a short fantasy baseball season. Find out how!

San Diego Padres’ Top Prospects

Are the San Diego Padres a team to watch during a shortened season? With the No. 2 overall farm system in the MLB, San Diego is welcoming its five Top 100 Prospects to The Show! Read more to find out who they are…

“All Talk, No Balk!” Podcast Now on Spotify!

Happy 4th of July Bullpen fans! What better way to spend the day than talking about America’s pastime? In celebration of American independence, we’re happy to announce that our new podcast, “All Talk, No Balk!”, is now on Spotify! Links are on the home page, or you can search “All Talk, No Balk!” on Spotify.

Opinion: This Isn’t Baseball…

It has been 244 days since the last MLB game was played, when the Washington Nationals beat the Houston Astros in Game 7 of the World Series. But with the recent rule changes for a shortened 2020 season, when you turn on the TV for Opening Day in 23 days, will you really be watching baseball?

Leverage measures how important a given situation is during a game (relative to the start of the game). The start of a game is defined as a Leverage of 1.0, a neutral situation. As the game progresses, the Leverage can fluctuate based on the inning, the number of outs, the runners on base, and the difference between the two teams' runs scored so far.

Leverage is the ratio between how much a single run scored changes the expected probability of winning in the current situation and how much a run would have changed the expected probability of winning at the very beginning of the game.

For example, if a run scored in the eighth inning increases the probability of winning by 20%, while a run at the start of the game increases it by 10%, then the Leverage of the situation in the eighth inning is 20%/10% = 2.00 Leverage.

Permanent link to Stat of the Week: Leverage

Are Pitching Wins Important?

In the modern world of analytics and technology in the game of baseball new statistics are taking over! It seems new stats and formulas are implemented into baseball on a weekly basis, leaving older stats with less credibility. One stat in particular is the pitcher’s win and understanding the true meaning such a statistic holds. Let’s dive in!

APR, or Adjusted Pitching Runs, measures the number of runs a pitcher prevented as compared to a league-average pitcher in a neutral park in the same number of innings. Derived from the pitching component of linear weights, or pitching runs, APR includes an adjustment for ballparks and is based on all runs allowed, not just the earned runs.

APR = L x IP - (R/PF)

Where "L" is the league average of runs per inning and "PF" is the park factor for the pitcher's home park.

Permanent link to Stat of the Week: APR

RA, or Run Average, is the number of runs (earned and unearned) allowed by a pitcher or team per 9 innings. Considering all runs allowed by a pitcher is more desirable from a predictive standpoint because it adjusts the arbitrary format of official scoring and the attribution, the problems of reconstructing an inning to determine unearned runs, and the small number of errors presently compared to the past that would normally be seen when measuring pitcher success through just an "earned runs" method. A pitcher good at preventing earned runs tends to be good at preventing unearned runs.

Permanent link to Stat of the Week: RA